Book Release Party: SHADOWS AFTER MIDNIGHT

Hello, my dear inklings, and welcome, Saltmarch fans!

Saltmarch, Where The Demons Live

As this unbearably hot summer hangs on tooth-and-nail to its ridiculously sweltering temperatures (here in Oklahoma, anyway), let us turn our mind’s eye to the near future, a future most glorious in its cooled-off-ness (we hope) and in its bringing of a near-and-dear-to-my-heart event, yea verily and forsooth.

 

That event, my little pumpernickels, is the BOOK RELEASE PARTY

for my second novel, SHADOWS AFTER MIDNIGHT (Demons of Saltmarch #2)

on SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8th, at 6:30PM

at VINTAGE TIMELESS COFFEE (900 NW 150th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73013).

And you are all invited! Tally-ho, zounds, and bangerang!

If you’ve not yet delved into my Demons of Saltmarch Series, please check out COLORS OF DECEPTION (Demons of Saltmarch #1). Buy it for $2.99 on Kindle or $12.99 in paperback!

If you are already well-versed in the Demons of Saltmarch world, come back to courtcan.com tomorrow for a sneak peek at SHADOWS AFTER MIDNIGHT! (And yes, this will be more than just the sample you found in the back of your COLORS copy.)

Dante and I hope to see you soon. ; )

Guest Blogger: Dante Mullins of Saltmarch

The author signed her books...never knowing that I watched.

I stepped into the coffee shop and knew
three things in an instant.

There were humans everywhere — flesh in
motion, sweat glistening, blood pulsing.

There wasn’t a hint of colors.
Holly — sweet, delectable, foolish creature
that she is — calls them “Technicolors.”
If only the communication between demon
and auguren were as simple as movie magic
technology.

But no matter. I saw not a single swipe of
color in the room, which was
enough to confirm no auguren was present.

Ah, you delicious humans — you should
know better than to come to my party
without one of your so-called saviors.

The third sensation that washed over me was
auditory:

They were playing my song.

Devil Inside.
The Strangest Party.
Need You Tonight.
Afterglow.

Take your pick, my tasty ones. If it’s the
sensual strains of INXS, it’s my song,
play it how you will.

Of course, none of the humans saw me as I
slipped in among them; I needed neither
human nor salt layers to enjoy myself in
this venue.

Without senses, I sensed them:
listening in, brushing an elbow here,
caressing the back of a neck there. I tasted
the heat of their breaths on the air.

My name was on their lips as they chatted
and flipped pages and sipped their lattes.
The syllables of my name echoed above the
crowd, rising to mix with the throbbing, savory
notes of my favorite music. If I had blood, it
would have pounded in that luscious rhythm.

If I had limbs, I would have danced and driven
them all wild.

The choice morsel who penned my story
signed her name again and again, never
knowing I stood at her shoulder, whispering
my appreciation. If she frowned once or
twice, it was only because, for one fraction
of a second, her soul felt my presence.

If her eyes scanned the crowd and met
another’s in the briefest of shared, troubled
looks, it was only because their exquisite
hearts trembled at the hunter’s nearness.

Ah, my tempting ones. Indeed, how I
longed to taste you. Just for a moment.

As I roved among them, old friends greeted
each other. New friends introduced themselves.
The baristas kept the coffee flowing. My own
favorite drink was not on tap — or, rather, I
restrained myself from tapping into it.

From a human perspective, blood and coffee
are not the best mixture. Nor do gobs of
flesh pair well with walnut brownies.

They laughed, all of them, those succulent,
frail humans. They mingled, they talked,
they congratulated the happy author. They
bought more books for her to sign, never
realizing that they were taking a piece of
me away with them.

How I shall enjoy getting to know them better.

Until next time, I remain most cravenly —
and cravingly — yours,

________________________________

The author would like to express (or espresso?) her gratitude to Vintage timeless Coffee for hosting the Colors of Deception Book Launch Party. Great fun was had and much coffee was imbibed by all. Everyone’s looking forward to launching Shadows after Midnight, Demons of Saltmarch Book 2, at Vintage in October!

Indie Author Freaks Out: Details at 11

In her Twenty Things NOT To Say To A Writer: A Handy Safety Guide, Laura Resnick tells us that a career of writing books “…is insanely competitive, disastrously unstable, and skull-crushingly difficult to do.”

My experience as a published author now encompasses exactly 13 days. So far, I have learned three very important things about this skull-crushingly difficult business, and I am going to tell you about them now.

3 Newbie Lessons from Getting Published

1. When promoting your book, start off strong — but pace yourself.
Thus far, Twitter, Kindleboards, Facebook, and blogging have been my greatest allies in promoting Colors of Deception. I’m tweeting and posting — and to my delight, followers and friends are retweeting and reposting. (Thanks, everybody! You guys are cramazing.)

The result of all this networking isn’t just book sales, though — it’s connections all over the place. It’s encouragements coming in from all sides. And it’s tweets and messages that deserve a personal response.

Right now, I’m happily responding, and I’m making the social media work for me. But I’m also thinking ahead to when I start my next writing project — soon. And when I start it, the networking must take a backseat. I might even have to lock the networking in the trunk.

Because if I’m networking all the time, I’m not writing. If I’m not writing, I’m not me. If I’m not writing, there won’t be any books to network about. So as I’m thinking ahead to the next big project, I’m reminding myself that when it comes to book/blog promotion,

I am a writer first and a business second.

Maybe third.

2. Not everyone will support you. And that’s okay.
I wrote a little about this last week, when I mentioned my tweet about others’ silence. Sometimes, that silence is a worse rejection than an in-your-face confrontation. When you publish a book, you want every single person you know to shower you with congrats. Not that you want heaps and oodles of attention*, but an acknowledgement would be nice, right?

Well, not everyone is going to acknowledge your accomplishment — and that’s okay. Do you acknowledge every single accomplishment of every single person you know? If the answer to that is yes, you can color, paint, and doodle me impressed. Me, I have to answer that question with no. And the reasons behind my negation are legion and would make a whole series of blog posts.

But it all boils down to this: Frankly, I can’t keep up with everybody.

And I can’t expect everybody to keep up with me, either. ; )

Here’s the deal, though: We don’t need everyone in our lives to acknowledge our authorial accomplishments. I think about it this way: When I lose tweetlings (aka followers) on Twitter, it doesn’t mean I’ve failed; it means I’m refining my audience. If people stop following me, it means they weren’t my audience in the first place.

The same applies to my books: If someone doesn’t acknowledge my publishing success, it just means that person isn’t my audience. Maybe they don’t read novels. Maybe they don’t read my genre.

Whatever the reason for their silence, it’s not the end of my world. It’s just the refining of my audience.

3. Book Launch Parties freak out my subconscious.
The Book Launch Party is tonight, and I’ll be posting about it on Thursday. Vintage timeless Coffee is hosting the shebang, and I know it’s going to be fantastic.

That knowledge, however, didn’t prevent the weird dream I had two nights ago of driving my dad to the book launch and heading the wrong way up multiple one-way streets. I tried making a U-turn in front of a lady in a red Dodge Charger, and she almost took the front of my car off.

Fortunately, I understand what’s going on here. I’m an introvert. There will be people at this party whom I don’t know. I’m an introvert. They’re going to want me to say something in front of everyone. I’m an introvert. There’s a reason I chose writing over a career in public speaking. ; )

In spite of my subconscious’s quiet little freak-out, here’s what I know:

I’m surrounded by a kaboodle of supportive friends and family.

Nothing bad is going to happen.

I’m going to have an incredible time.

___________________________
Are you an indie or self-published author?

Do you find this business “insanely competitive, disastrously unstable, and skull-crushingly difficult?” Why or why not?

What are your words of wisdom for the indies and self-pubbed?

What are your sub-/conscious fears about publishing, and how do you deal with them?

___________________________

* Let’s admit it: We writers do like the attention. 😉